Are You A Rebel Writer?

Are you one of those format writing junkies that can’t stray away from a perfectly structured sentence?

OR

Are you the type that says, “I don’t need formality I need Originality”, you stray away from the rules of writing and do your own thing?

I must say if you answered yes to the first one…YOU ARE B-O-R-I-N-G!

The second answer I define as a Rebel Writer, and I highly recommend you write this way, but there is a right way to be a rebel writer and definitely a wrong way.

1. Know Your Bounds-

As a writer you need to know the right way to do things. You must know correct punctuation, structure, formality, and grammar. If you struggle with this either surf the web, pick up a writing guide book, or click on the links below.

http://www.towson.edu/ows/sentencestruct.htm,

http://www.grammarbook.com/grammar/effWrite.asp,

Knowing the correct way to do things is important, because if you are being a rebel writer by accident…well then, you aren’t truly a rebel at all but more so an ignorant writer.

Learn the right way to write and your on your way to better writing!

2. Use Formality With A Rebellious Twist-

Balance is the key! People don’t want something completely foreign. They like to know that there is still something familiar within your writing as everything else, but then again, they don’t want something to be like EVERYTHING else.

So what you must do is stretch out your creativity and abuse the steps of the writing rules.

An example of this is through Dialogue.

Formal: “I’m so exited I can’t wait.”

Rebellious: “I’m sooo excited….I can’t wait!!!”

Be unique with your writing to show the audience what is happening instead of just telling. Here is another example for a paragraph.

Formal: I stepped foot into the pond and felt the cool water dance along my toes. I don’t think I have ever felt anything more chilling or more wonderful all at the same time. Suddenly around the bush I heard a crunching noise. I quickly pulled my toes out of the water and ran away in fear it was the ghost.

Rebellious: I stepped foot in the pond and felt the cool water dance along my toes. I don’t think I have ever felt anything more chilling, and yet more gloriously wonderful, all at the same time.

*Crunch

My heart raced, my vision blurred, and I felt frantic. What if….

I quickly pulled my toes out of the water and ran, too fast for my own pleasure, but I needed to. I looked behind me in fear that The GHOST was upon me.

What I have done is change the different sections to be a little more staggered. I try to envision how it would feel if I was in the characters position. At first it was slow, but then everything seemed to jump at you faster as you went. I didn’t completely change the paragraph because this way people will still be familiar reading it.

3. Be Cautious-

You should use your rebellious side, but with caution! You want to use it in your writing to mean something. You can’t just use it every time you get the chance to. Even in my example above I drenched it with too much Rebellious, but I needed to show you something.

Use your rebellious side sparingly and only when you want something to stand out.

Effective rebellious writers use it for uniqueness and to explain their story through their different way of showing. If you use it like I did above (too much of it) then it might appear as poor quality writing.

After what I have shown you today I hope you can stretch out your rebellious side, and use it effectively within your writing. Let me know if you have any questions, thoughts, or would like to ask for help.

See you next time,

A. Willow

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Are You A Rebel Writer?

  1. Meridith says:

    I’m not that much of a internet reader to be honest but your sites really nice, keep it up!
    I’ll go ahead and bookmark your site to come back down the road. Many thanks

  2. Your style is very unique in comparison to other people I
    have read stuff from. I appreciate you for posting when you have the
    opportunity, Guess I’ll just bookmark this blog.

What are your Thoughts?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s